Guardians cover a parent’s traditional responsibilities

| Nov 14, 2019 | Guardianships and Conservatorships

Parenting is the first, and perhaps, most important part of a child’s life. Parents set the standard for children’s behavior, instilling ethics and values that last throughout a person’s lifetime. It is best for individuals and society as a whole that children have good role models close at hand to support them materially and emotionally.

When biological or adoptive parents are not available for a child, a family member or other concerned adult connected to the child may apply for guardianship under Connecticut law. This title carries the duty and obligation of care for the person below the age of 21 under the guardian’s care.

This is a very serious responsibility, as children will rely on guardians for the decisions that parents would make in the same circumstances. Education, health care, discipline and social activities are all finally ruled upon by a guardian until the child turns 21.

If a child has a disability that prevents him or her from taking full responsibility of life, a guardian may apply to become a conservator of the adult upon the time of adulthood. Conservators also manage financial issues and any business or trust concerns that belong in some way to the person being conserved.

These roles and other details of guardianship can be explained by an attorney. Legal representation is also a good idea when a person is appearing in probate court in connection with a guardianship case. Probate courts are open to all, but a lawyer can make sure that all details are covered, and a person’s interests are being protected.